Seeing Beyond the Trees
The Social Dimensions of Aboriginal Forest Management

David C. Natcher    (Ed.)

Captus Press, ISBN 978-1-55322-178-4 (2008)
262 pages, 470 g, 7 X 10, $33.50 (US$26.80)
 

Seeing Beyond the Trees: The Social Dimensions of Aboriginal Forest Management represents 10 years of collaborative research between the Little Red River Cree Nation (LRRCN) and academic researchers from across Canada. This text examines the web of interactions that influence culture, economy and the sustainability of the natural environment.

The common theme throughout this text is the need to link research to management, policy, and the real-world needs of First Nation communities. Today’s forest managers must now consider the social and political context of land use, value systems and expectations, and emerging rights-based issues involving Aboriginal peoples.

This text is an ideal resource for students, educators and forest stakeholders who engage in planning or forest management with First Nations.

Table of Contents   top

Acknowledgments
Introduction

I. Traditional Forest Use

  1. Hunting in the Bush Is Our Culture

Introduction
Background
Methodology
Traditional Ecological Knowledge
Social-Cultural Value of Moose
Learning Through Doing and the Loss of Knowledge
Moose in the Diet
Moose Population Estimates
Moose Conservation
Park Regulations
Cooperative Management
Issues and Recommendations
Conclusion
References

  1. Subsistence Harvesting and the Cultural Sustainability of the Little Red River Cree Nation

Introduction
Survey Design and Methods
Harvest Survey Results and Analysis
Conclusions and Future Directions
References

  1. Social and Economic Barriers to Subsistence Harvesting in Aboriginal Communities

Introduction
Background on the Little Red River Cree Nation
Impacts of Diminished Harvesting
Barriers to Subsistence Harvesting
Barriers to Harvesting
Potential Solutions to Harvesting Barriers
Symbolic and Practical Values of Subsistence Harvesting
References

  1. Health and Well-Being Among the LittleRed River Cree Nation

Introduction
Methodology
Critical Issues and Recommendations
Revisiting the Components of Health

II. The Changing Forest Economy

  1. Indigenous Tourism Development in Northern Canada: Beyond Economic Incentives

Introduction
Indigenous Tourism and Development
The People, Place and Tourism
Research and Methods
Motivations for Tourism Development
Discussion
Conclusions
References

  1. Can Forest Management Strategies Sustain the Development Needs of the Little Red River Cree Nation?

Introduction
Background
Study Objective
Methodology
Outcomes for Alternative Management Scenarios
Evaluating the Alternative Strategies for LRRCN
Conclusion
Appendix
References

  1. The Forest Economy of the Little Red River Cree Nation

Introduction
Background
Methodology
Industry Overview
Educational Barriers
Economic Barriers
Cultural Barriers
Conclusion
References

III. Policy and Management

  1. Traditional Environmental Knowledge of Critical Ungulate Habitat of the Caribou Mountains — Lower Peace River Region

Introduction
Background
Methods
Results
Management Implications
References

  1. Putting the “Community” Back into Community-Based Resource Management

Introduction
Criteria and Indicators of Sustainability
Methodology
Monitoring and Evaluation
Conclusion
References

  1. Consultation, Cooperative Management and the Reconciliation of Rights

Introduction
The LRRCN Cooperative Management  Planning Process
Rights, Consultation and Cultural  Sustainability
Toward Meaningful Consultation
Conclusion
References

  1. Forest Co-Management in Northern Alberta

Introduction
Context for Forest Co-Management  in Northern Alberta
Methods
Challenges for Co-Management in  the Context of Industrial Forestry
Conclusions: Co-Management and Challenges  to Industrial Forestry
References

  1. Postscript

Assessing the True Value of the LRRCN Subsistence and Resource Use
Coming to “Grips” with Industrial Forestry?
Incorporating Cree Knowledge into Decision-Making

Notes on Contributors

Instructor Resources   top

Related Resources   top

About the Author   top

David C. Natcher (Ph.D.) is a cultural anthropologist and an Associate Professor in the Department of Agricultural Economics at the University of Saskatchewan. Dr. Natcher has worked with the Little Red River Cree Nation on various research projects over the past 10 years. During the time that this volume was being compiled, Dr. Natcher held a Tier II Canada Research Chair in Aboriginal Studies at Memorial University of Newfoundland.